Rap Album Dissertation, Teaching Computer Science Without Computers, and People Asking Artists to Work for Free

Clemson doctoral student produces rap album for dissertation; it goes viral

The album, “Owning My Masters: The Rhetorics of Rhymes and Revolutions” uses hip-hop to explore such ideas as identity, justice, economics, citizenship and language. The songs have garnered tens of thousands of views on YouTube, more than 50,000 streams and downloads on SoundCloud and hundreds of thousands of hits on Facebook, all before Carson defends them as a whole to his doctoral committee Friday in the Watt Family Innovation Center auditorium. Using a music album for a dissertation, as opposed to the usual written document, has never been done at Clemson before, but Carson says it was the only way he could do it.

 

Teaching Computer Science Without Computers

In other words, knowing how to use something isn’t the same as understanding how it works. And because programming can be taught in so many ways, Liukas said, it can be an opportunity for kids to learn lots of related skills, such as how to collaborate, how to tell a story, and how to think creatively.
“This demands a lot from the teachers, obviously,” Liukas said during a presentation at the embassy event. This is true in the sense that incorporating coding and programming lessons across disciplines requires all kinds of educators, from the science teacher to the art teacher, to understand the basics. But it’s also a manageable challenge in Finland because teachers there have more autonomy than American teachers when it comes to how and what they teach, and they aren’t constantly evaluated by how their students score on standardized tests.

 

Tired Of Being Asked To Work For Free, This Artist Started Drawing These Client Requests

@forexposure_txt is a Twitter account dedicated to compiling quotes from artists who were expected to work for free. It was created by artist and writer Ryan Estrada, and we previously wrote about it here.
Well now an artist has decided to take some of those quotes and use them to inspire various portraits of what she imagines those people look like. They’re part of a series titled “For Exposure,” and they were created for Format Magazine by Emmie Tsumura, a Toronto-based illustrator and graphic designer.

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